ARC® Fertility Blog

Yes, Weight Matters to Your Fertility and Infertility Treatment

Weight affects fertility

Yes, Weight Matters to Your Fertility and Infertility Treatment

Medical conditions are often covered on tv shows and in movies; given their often large audiences, it’s especially important to get the facts right. A recent episode of the popular tv show “This is Us” recently tackled the topic of whether being overweight or obese negatively affects a woman’s fertility.

The storyline follows a character named “Kate Pearson” who is 38, obese and last season experienced a miscarriage. On this year’s premiere, a fertility specialist told Kate “At your weight, the chances for a successful pregnancy are very slim—even with IVF.” Obesity does affect pregnancy rates, increases the risk of miscarriage and may result in poorer outcomes with in vitro fertilization (IVF).

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Why Infertility Treatment Should be a Covered Benefit

Infertility is a disease and deserves to be covered by health insurance like other medical conditions. There are compelling business and social reasons to support this case.

“Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system that impairs the body’s ability to perform the basic function of reproduction.”  That’s what the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) – the professional society for reproductive medicine physicians and providers – declared back in 1993. Despite this statement by professional experts, it took many more years for other major health groups to formally agree.

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The Top 5 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Infertility

The Top 5 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Infertility

Going to see an infertility specialist can be both daunting and give you hope. You may be entering a world that calls for learning new medical terms and about diagnostic tests you’ve never heard of. And, if discussing different treatment options such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), you might also have a practical discussion of what it may cost to achieve your family-building dreams.

Today, most patients are advised to be prepared when they visit their doctor and to have a list of questions ready to ask. This is certainly a good idea for you and partner when meeting with your infertility doctor.

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Home Fertility Tests, Apps and Pop-Ups – What You Need to Know

Home Fertility Tests, Apps and Pop-Ups – What You Need to Know

Knowing more about your individual fertility is a good thing, especially given the general lack of awareness – often among young women – about the age when fertility starts to decline. This lack of knowledge has real-life implications if women make decisions based on the mistaken idea they can easily get pregnant and deliver a healthy baby in their late 30’s/early 40’s.

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Opioids and Infertility – What You and Your Doctor Should Know

Women of childbearing age may be especially affected by the use and misuse of opioids, however, the impact of the drugs on fertility and infertility treatment is rarely discussed.

The use and misuse of opioids in the US have reached epidemic proportions and women of childbearing age may be especially affected. While many of the consequences have been well-documented – abuse, injury, death from overdose – the impact on fertility and infertility treatment is largely left out of the discussion. That must change.

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When Do I Need an Egg Donor?

When do I need an egg donor?

Today’s media coverage would have you believe that celebrities giving birth well into their forties is commonplace. What goes unreported is that most often a much younger egg donor was used because of the celebrity’s age and associated reduced fertility. In fact, age-related decline in fertility is the primary reason a woman who is trying to get pregnant might want to use an egg donor. Once the decision has been made to use an assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedure such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) the next decision for an older woman is whether she will use her own eggs or donor eggs.

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How to Deal with Infertility and Depression

Dealing with infertility or depression is a major challenge, but trying to cope with both at once can be overwhelming. Fortunately, treatment is available to help you build your family while addressing your depression.

Anyone who follows the news has noticed what seems to be an epidemic of depression. While rates may be on the rise, there’s also a new willingness to discuss the issue more openly. In this way and others, depression, and infertility share traits – both are medical conditions, deserve to have treatment covered, and more work remains to reduce the stigma.

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The Unique Challenges of Secondary Infertility

Secondary infertility is the inability to establish a clinical pregnancy after a previous pregnancy whether or not there was a live birth. It affects nearly 3 million couples and accounts for 1/3 of visits to a fertility specialist.

You may be well-informed about a variety of healthcare topics but there’s a good chance you’ve never heard of “secondary infertility.” It’s the inability to establish a clinical pregnancy after a previous pregnancy whether or not there was a live birth. While it may not be a mainstream topic, secondary infertility affects nearly three million couples, double the number from 1995. It also accounts for approximately one-third all visits to see a fertility specialist.

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Lost in Translation? A Glossary of Infertility Acronyms to Help

Woman with Question Marks

Lost in Translation? A Glossary of Infertility Acronyms to Help

There’s no doubt there’s an education in store for couples who enter the world of infertility as diagnosis and treatment seem to come with their own special language. It begins with learning the basic terminology for tests and procedures you’ll discuss with your doctor. Once you’ve mastered the acronyms for the basics – like IVF – there seems to be a constant stream of new terms to learn with treatment. And, in the vibrant online forums/message boards where infertility is discussed – mostly among women – the acronyms that abound serve as short hand for common medical terms and a variety of expressions that help define the infertility journey.

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Listen Up

Listen Up

BeatInfertilty.co interviews Dr. Adamson

Dr. Adamson and Heather discuss the various treatment packages and other financial options ARC Fertility offers:

INTRODUCTION

I’d like to start by hearing a little bit more about you and ARC Fertility as a whole. Tell us about your background, how you ended up specializing in reproductive endocrinology, and why you founded ARC Fertility.

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How ARC® Fertility Helps You Move Forward with Care

How ARC® Fertility Helps You Move Forward with Care

Chances are if you’ve received a diagnosis of infertility and decided to pursue treatment, you already know a variety of challenges lie ahead. Among those is making decisions about how to pay for in vitro fertilization (IVF) and the fertility medications you may need to take. The total cost of treatment can feel overwhelming and out-of-reach, even discouraging. In fact, 30% of people who seek fertility treatment drop out before it begins, primarily due to cost. Still, when the goal is having a baby, it’s comforting to know there are options to help make treatment more affordable.

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5 Steps for Improving Your Credit Score

5 Steps for Improving Your Credit Score

For most people, a realistic timeframe to improve your score is 6 months. More serious problems such as delinquencies or bankruptcy take longer to fix. Do keep in mind that lenders have different policies about who qualifies for a loan and at what rate, and that recent behavior makes a difference.

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Use Your Voice on Infertility Issues – Join Advocacy Day May 23!

“The time is now to get organized, be loud and show up. Family-building issues are bi-partisan and we need to find support where we can.” That’s the rallying cry of RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association which created the annual Advocacy Day event to bring together the infertility community to discuss important issues with members of Congress.

Advocacy Day in Washington, DC provides an opportunity for patients and health professionals to remind policymakers that infertility is a medical disease (as determined by the World Health Organization and all the major reproductive medicine societies in the world) that needs to be treated and requires access to affordable coverage. Major issues that will be discussed on Capitol Hill this year include: increasing insurance coverage, covering fertility preservation, family-building options, financial relief, opposing personhood laws and helping veterans. Learn more about these issues.

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How to Face Mother’s Day When You’re Coping with Infertility

Mother and Daughter

How to Face Mother’s Day When You’re Coping with Infertility

Mother’s Day is not just another Sunday in May for women who are already dealing with the challenges of infertility. It’s a big splashy, impossible-to-miss holiday with flowers, cards, brunch and family get-togethers. Unlike other holidays that more broadly focus on families or couples – like Christmas and Valentine’s Day – Mother’s Day celebrates one unique and treasured relationship. For women with an infertility diagnosis, the holiday can feel especially painful and isolating.

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It’s a Dream, More than Just a Disease – Join National Infertility Awareness Week April 22-28

Flip the Script

It’s a Dream, More than Just a Disease – Join National Infertility Awareness Week April 22-28

Infertility can affect anyone – it doesn’t know the boundaries of gender, race, religion, sexuality or income. Everyone coping with this serious medical condition knows the challenges that abound – medical, financial, and emotional. What can help is creating an environment – or, better yet, a community – where facts, not myth, and acceptance not stigma, are the rule and not the exception. The ability to have a conversation and gain understanding and support goes a long way.

Since 1 in every 8 Americans has been diagnosed with infertility, it’s very likely someone you know – a family member, neighbor or co-worker – is dealing with the disease and all its stressors. As RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association and sponsor of National Infertility Awareness Week (NIAW) reminds us, it’s not just older women who waited too long to have children. While you may not have yet had a conversation with someone close on the topic, there’s a way to show you care during NIAW from April 22-28. Join millions of people across the country dedicated to the proposition that everyone who wants to build a family should be able to.

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Infertility Stresses Men Too, According to New Research

Man Looking Out Window

Infertility Stresses Men Too, According to New Research

Everyone faces stress in their lives but research shows some life events – the death of someone close, a divorce, or loss of a job – have a bigger impact than others. Add infertility to the list as causing major stress: evidence shows that women faced with infertility have stress levels comparable to being a cancer patient.

But what about men?

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Fertility Counseling Before Cancer Treatment Improves Quality of Life

Fertility Counseling Before Cancer Treatment Improves Quality of Life

While it’s never good to receive a cancer diagnosis, today’s latest treatments often mean a long life as a cancer survivor. And, if you haven’t yet had children – or would like more – studies show that receiving pre-treatment fertility preservation counseling not only provides important information about options, it can also improve your quality of life. Currently, such counseling practice is not yet standard or widespread, but it should be.

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