ARC® Fertility Overview

Infertility: Helping Mother Nature

Infertility is a highly personal and emotional subject and it’s a medical problem that is growing. In fact, six million American adults will be touched by infertility this year representing all ages, socioeconomic groups, and genders. Because of the personalized nature of infertility—the inability to conceive or take a baby to term—there is no one […]

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Infertility Evaluation

Infertility Evaluation Definition The textbook definition of infertility is when a couple has difficulty achieving pregnancy after trying for one year. However, the work-up can be started earlier even if a couple has attempted pregnancy for a shorter period, especially if the female partner is older than 35. Some women have a known condition that […]

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Infertility

Definition: Inability to get pregnant after one year of attempts (if the woman partner is under age 35) or after 6 months of attempts (if over age 35). Incidence: Approximately 10-12% of couples are unable to conceive. The chance of a fertile couple to conceive is 20-25% each month, or 85% after 12 months of […]

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How do I choose a fertility specialist?

Finding the right physician under any circumstances can be a daunting task. A patient who needs help with fertility may be faced with complicated medical decisions. Friends, family, and even the press and the Internet can provide contradictory information, making it extremely important that each patient find the most appropriate physician to advise her, support […]

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Hope. Dream. Hold Your Miracle.

After months of trying to get pregnant without success, “infertility” is never a word a couple wants to hear from their physician. Today, many couples are gaining hope from improvements for infertility diagnosis and treatment — making the dream of conceiving a child a real possibility. Infertility is a common disease many couples face during […]

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The Good Egg…Everything You Need to Know About Ovulation

Ovulation is perhaps the single most important factor when trying to conceive. Women who have infrequent, irregular, or no ovulation (anovulation) will find that conceiving is either very difficult or downright impossible. Understanding Ovulation Ovulation is when a mature egg is released from the ovary and makes it way through the fallopian tube in anticipation […]

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Ask the Experts: Fertility Q&A

For many in our audience who are not familiar with the science of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility maybe you can provide a brief overview? Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility is a branch of medicine that identifies and treats infertility in both men and women. In the United States, 15 percent of all couples will face fertility […]

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Fertility 101 (Part 2)

Fertility 101 Part 1 addresses the basic infertility work-up. This article will discuss specific causes and their evaluation. Male Factor The male factor is estimated to be significant in 40%-50% of couples. To determine the adequacy of the spermatozoa, the man must submit a semen sample for analysis after at least 2, but no more […]

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Fertility 101 (Part 1)

Infertility is defined as a failure to conceive after 1 year of unprotected, appropriately timed intercourse without conception. The prevalence of infertility among couples in the United States is approximately 10%-15%. Possible contributing factors include advanced maternal age due to delay in child bearing and a decrease in sexual activity with increasing length of relationship. […]

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Diminishing Ovarian Reserve

As more women are delaying childbirth and more baby boomers are reaching midlife, the problem of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is increasing. This has several major medical consequences including infertility, decreased bone mass with risk of fracture, abnormal uterine bleeding from lack of regular ovulation, and hot flashes. This article will address ovarian reserve testing […]

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Body Fat, Exercise and Fertility

Numerous studies have repeatedly shown that women athletes who have a low body mass index, (‘BMI’), have a difficult time starting a family. We have found with our patient population that a number of female athletes have a low BMI. This low BMI often translates into fertility problems. In fact studies have shown that approximately12% of infertility cases are due to being underweight or having a low BMI.

Body fat plays a significant role in reproduction. Sex hormones are fat soluble and they are stored in the body’s fat layers. Women that have a low BMI produce a reduced amount of estrogen which can lead to an abnormal menstrual cycle. Amenorrhea, or the lack of a menstrual cycle, is a result of a low BMI.

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Aromatase Inhibitor (Letrozole) Shows Promising Results in Fertility Treatment

Ovulatory dysfunction is one of the most common causes of reproductive failure in subfertile and infertile couples. Since the first clinical trial was published in 1961, clomiphene citrate (CC) has been the front-line therapy for ovulation induction. Its use quickly expanded to other empiric indications, such as luteal phase defect and the enhancement of fecundity in unexplained infertility. Failure to respond to CC occurs in up to 20% of cases, which may then require the use of injectable gonadotropins. The drawbacks of this approach are its high cost (both for the medication and the extensive monitoring it requires), risk of the potentially life-threatening ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), and, perhaps most importantly, the significant risk of high-order multiple gestations. Clearly, an inexpensive yet equally efficacious oral alternative would be ideal. Recent research has focused on the successful use of aromatase inhibitors, mainly letrozole, for ovulation induction. The medical team at Georgia Reproductive Specialists has begun incorporating letrozole into treatment plans for appropriately selected patients.

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