Article Library For Women’s Health Care Issues

ARC® Women’s Health Care

Endometriosis from a Patient’s Point of View

By Wendy Vogt, a patient of Dr. Andrew Cook
http://www.vitalhealth.com
Vital Health Institute
15055 Los Gatos Blvd., Suite 250
Los Gatos, CA 95032-2025
(408) 358-2511

When you type “endometriosis” into Google and hit Search, you get something like 6,370,000 matches. Clicking on the definition link at the top gives you this:

A condition, usually resulting in pain and dysmenorrhea, that is characterized by the abnormal occurrence of functional endometrial tissue outside the uterus.

Well, that’s … uh, I have no idea what that means. I’m not a doctor – I’m just a normal person trying to get information. Let’s try somewhere else. What about the Wikipedia? You get this:

A common medical condition where the tissue lining the uterus (the endometrium, from endo, “inside”, and metra, “womb”) is found outside of the uterus, typically affecting other organs in the pelvis. The condition can lead to serious health problems, primarily pain and infertility. Endometriosis primarily develops in women of the reproductive age.

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New Therapy for an Old Nemesis: Neural Tube Defects

Keith A Hansen M.D.©
http://womens.sanfordhealth.org
Sanford Health Fertility and Reproductive Medicine
1500 W. 22nd Street, Suite 102
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
(605) 328-8800

Art begins in imitation and ends in innovation. – Mason Cooley

Neural tube defects (NTDs), the second-most common major congenital anomaly, can occur as an isolated event, with other anomalies, or as a component of a syndrome and may cause significant neurologic morbidity for the affected individual. These defects occur due to fusion abnormalities of the developing neural tube prior to 6 weeks gestational age and include abnormalities in formation of the brain or the spinal cord. NTDs are multifactorial in etiology, with both a genetic predisposition as well as an environmental influence.

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An Uncommon Etiology For A Common Problem: Hirsutism

Emily Winterton, MD; Kathleen Eyster, PhD; Keith A Hansen M.D.©
http://womens.sanfordhealth.org
Sanford Health Fertility and Reproductive Medicine
1500 W. 22nd Street, Suite 102
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
(605) 328-8800

Abstract
Hirsutism is a common problem affecting women that is usually the result of a benign etiology. However, sudden onset or rapidly progressive hirsutism, especially when accompanied by virilizing signs, is suspicious for androgen producing neoplasms of the ovaries or adrenals. A 28-year-old female presented with the rapid onset of hirsutism and virilizing signs, accompanied by a markedly elevated serum testosterone. Initial imaging studies demonstrated
normal adrenal glands and ovaries. She was later discovered to have a rare steroid-secreting ovarian tumor. This case emphasizes the importance of a high level of suspicion for an androgen-producing neoplasm in the patient with sudden onset or rapid progression of virilizing signs and symptoms.

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